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The Nissan Titan

Posted by charlesdowney on April 23, 2008

The Nissan Titan introduced in 2004, is a full-size pickup truck produced for the North American market by Nissan. The Titan is not intended to challenge the big 3 “Detroit Trucks” in sales numbers, but rather is meant to be an alternative to them and provide Nissan with some in-roads into the highly competitive truck market. Nissan’s full-size pickup truck gets more power for 2007. Titan comes as the Crew Cab and as the extended-cab King. Kings have rear-opening back doors that don’t open independently of the fronts, but swing out flat against the bodysides. Kings have a 6.5-ft cargo bed, Crews a 5.5-ft box. The sole engine is again a 5.6-liter V8 but now with 317 hp vs. 305. It teams with a 5-speed automatic transmission. XE, SE, and LE trims are available, each with rear- or 4-wheel drive. The 4WD system has low-range gearing but should not be left engaged on dry pavement. Antilock 4-wheel disc brakes are standard, an antiskid system is available. Traction control is standard with 4WD, available with 2WD.

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New Nissan Sentra

Posted by charlesdowney on April 23, 2008

These new Nissan Sentra have a larger engine with 165 hp in the SE-R and 175 in the Spec V. The SE-R has unique interior trim, a sport suspension, and 16-inch wheels vs. other Sentras’ 14s or 15s. The SE-R Spec V gets further suspension revisions, 17-inch wheels, distinct exterior styling touches, and its own interior decor, including sport front seats. Manual transmission is standard on all models–a 6-speed on the Spec V and a 5-speed on the others. All but the Spec V are available with automatic transmission. Side airbags and ABS are optional on all but the XE and CA. SE-R and Spec V have 4-wheel disc brakes. Helped by early introduction of redesigned 2001 models, Sentra sales jumped 56.5 percent year-to-year in calendar 2000, then rose another 13.5 percent in the first nine months of 2001. Of course, people often turn to smaller, more affordable cars when economic life gets difficult, but Sentra’s recent showing is commendable all the same.

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Mr. Bean’s Car

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

Mr bean car.jpg

The Mini was a cultural icon and shows up in movies such as The Italian Job (1969), in which 3 Mk1 Austin Mini Cooper S’s are used in a gold bullion robbery; in The Bourne Identity (2002) as a beat-up but surprisingly capable vehicle for a car chase; or in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001) as a collectible fashion icon garaged alongside other classic sports cars. It has also featured in television shows such as (as the Mini Moke) in The Prisoner and Mr. Bean.

Mr. Bean’s car, a late 1970s MK IV British Leyland Mini 1000, developed a character of sorts. At first, an orange 1969 Morris Mini MK II (registration RNT 996H, although the body of the car was actually from an MK1 car of 1963/64) was Mr. Bean’s vehicle of choice, but this was destroyed in a crash at the end of the first episode. From then on, the car was a 1977 model (registration SLW 287R), luminous lime green in colour with a black bonnet. It made its first appearance in “The Curse of Mr. Bean”. The Mini was central to several antics, such as Mr. Bean getting dressed in it while driving or steering it while sitting in an armchair strapped to the roof. It also had a number of innovative security measures; Mr. Bean fitted the door with a bolt-latch and padlock, rather than use the lock fitted on the car, and he always removed the steering wheel instead of the key, which formed a running joke in several episodes, at one point deterring a car thief. In Mr. Bean Rides Again, he also hid the ignition key under the car bonnet, the key for the bonnet was kept in the boot, the key for the boot was attached to the sun visor above the driver’s seat. The key to the car door was the only key Bean kept with him. The car, confused with another demonstration car of the exact same model (registration ACW 497V), was crushed by a tank in “Back to School, Mr. Bean”, but returned in later episodes, perhaps having actually been the identical demonstration car from that point on. Mr. Bean always checks his Mini Cooper Parts before he used it on a shoot.

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Mercedes Benz SLR McLaren

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

For this project I chose to purchase another supercar, the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren. The reason why I chose this car was because the holidays coincided with Dad’s birthday, and since he has always wanted to own a Mercedes-Benz, I’ve decided to buy the finest Mecedes-Benz and give it to Dad as a birthday present. Just how much car does half a million dollars buy you? In the case of the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, quite a lot. The SLR unites the Formula One-proven technology of McLaren with Mercedes engineering, listing a carbon fiber chassis and a 600-plus horsepower engine among its features. Most ultra-fast supercars have sacrificed comfort for performance, but the SLR tries to give drivers the best of both worlds. In this article, we’ll see how McLaren and Mercedes have managed to create a world-class high-performance car with windshield wipers that still work at 200 mph. Interior and exterior features of the SLR McLaren include 19 inches asymmetric turbine wheels, bi-xenon twin headlamps, sideline exhaust, Silver Arrow leather upholstery, 7-speaker Bose sound system, carbon fiber bucket seats, airbrake switch and dials for the AMG speedshift R transmission programs, flip top start button, and many others. To sum it up, the Mercedes Benz SLR McLaren is currently one of the automobile industry’s finest models ever launched. Optimum driving pleasure is guaranteed to be experienced once my Dad gets behind its wheel. Truly, the SLR McLaren is one amazing catch! And of course Mercedes Benz SLR McLaren Parts are great deal of best quality performance.

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2008 Maserati GranTurismo

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

The 2008 Maserati GranTurismo gets it right, dumping the lumpy form of the outgoing Maserati GT for an aggressive new shape stretched over a longer chassis. It’s what an exotic should look like, and it took the master sculptors at Pininfarina to accomplish its great auto body parts. But doesn’t that tail borrow too liberally from rival Aston Martin? The 2008 Maserati GranTurismo replaces the Maserati GT coupe, which was introduced in 2002. It has more power, more room inside, and crisp new sheetmetal designed by Pininfarina. The 2008 Maserati GranTurismo rides a shortened version of the chassis used by the critically acclaimed four-door Maserati Quattroporte. It has a 405-horsepower V-8 driving the rear wheels and is likely to cost around $125,000, some $30,000 more than the GT and right in line with such competitors as the Aston Martin V8 Vantage.

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Lincoln Zephyr

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

2006 -Lincoln Zephyr.jpgOriginally, the Zephyr was introduced in 1935 and was produced until 1942. However, the name Zephyr was again used to revive the old model in 2005 but this time, the name Zephyr was changed to MKZ by 2006 as a 2007 model. Lincoln’s 1941 lineup consisted of three model groups: the Series 16H 1941 Lincoln Zephyr, the Continental coupe and cabriolet (now bearing appropriate badges), and the 138-inch-wheelbase Series 168H Custom sedan and limousine. The last were meant to carry on the coachbuilt tradition of the now-discontinued K-series, but they were pure Zephyr at heart. Lincoln began a long decline in both sales and market share in 1941. Much of this has been blamed on the V-12, but there were other, more significant factors. For one thing, Lincoln had a weaker dealer network than its main rivals (Ford dealers sold Zephyrs in some parts of the country), a situation that wouldn’t be rectified until Lincoln-Mercury Division was formed at the close of World War II. Nevertheless, when you talk about the original Zephyr, it refers to the two-door and four-door sedan, and the three-window coupe that was added in 1937, followed by the convertible coupe and sedan a year later, and an additional club coupe in 1940. Considering you own a Lincoln Zephyr automobile and been looking for its performance, aftermarket and replacement of your Lincoln Zephyr parts including stylish and practical accessories, then you have just found the perfect site. Car Parts Wholesale offer great deals of high quality Lincoln Zephyr parts for your various automotive needs.

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Do-It-Yourself Job

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

Xenon projector low beam headlamp illuminated on a Saab 9-5.

Last weekend, I had to replace a burned out headlight on my Chevrolet HHR. I figured this was a do-it-yourself job. So I ordered to online auto body parts store for a new halogen bulb, when it arrive, and popped the hood.

Roughly 45 minutes and a few choice words later, I got the job done. In the course of replacing one burned-out bulb, I used a socket wrench and pliers to partially remove a plastic liner inside the left front wheel well. I took out about a half dozen fasteners, of two different kinds. Then I had to work my hand through a tangle of wires to get at the offending bulb, disconnect it, twist it out, and then replace it. I did all this by feel, because I couldn’t see my hand, wedged inside the fender between the half removed plastic liner and the wires and metal around the light.

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The MG TC

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

The MG TC seemed hardly the sort of thing to spark a revolution. It was already quite outmoded when announced in 1945 as one of Britain’s first postwar cars. It was only mildly evolved from MG’s prewar TA/TB roadsters, which themselves weren’t very different from the first Morris Garages car of 1923. But the TC, as later MG ads proclaimed, was “the sports car America loved first,” and things haven’t been the same since. It was quite similar to the pre-war TB, sharing the same engine with a slightly higher compression ratio of 7.4:1 giving 54.5 bhp (40.6 kW) at 5200 rpm but using more modern interior elements allowing a wider cockpit. It was exported to the United States, even though only ever built in right hand drive. The export version had slightly smaller US specification sealed beam head lights and larger twin rear lights, as well as turn signals and chrome-plated front and rear bumpers. Over 10,000 were produced, a large number by MG standards. It cost £527 on the home market in 1947.

In retrospect, the TC was fortuitously timed for a postwar America with money to burn and time to spare. Who cared that performance was leisurely or that the skimpy top defied all operating logic? This was a car for sunny days and roads less traveled, one you drove for the sheer pleasure of it, not just to go somewhere. Old-fashioned it may have been, but the MG TC helped make driving a new American sport, and in the late 1940s, that was revolution indeed. Auto Parts Train continues its commitment to giving you a more affordable yet superb quality MG parts option.

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The Mercury

Posted by charlesdowney on April 4, 2008

Mercury’s range is quite small and very similar to those sold under the Ford brand. Many industry observers have questioned whether Mercury will survive in the long term, but Ford insists that there is no intentions of letting the brand die. The introduction of new models, such as the Milan, and the Mariner, as well as the revival of the Sable would seem to bear that out. Its alliance with Lincoln has helped keep the brand alive; all Lincoln dealers also sell Mercury vehicles, as they desire some lower-priced vehicles in their showrooms.

Outside of ponycars, Mercury’s new-model development story in the ’70s was primarily one of “badge engineering.” It began when the Comet name was revived for a restyled version of Ford’s new-for-1970 compact Maverick, distinguished mainly by a Montego-style nose. Announced for 1971, this Comet soldiered on through ’74 as the division’s sole representative in a size and price sector that took on urgent new importance in the wake of the 1973-74 Middle East oil embargo.

Mercury decisively completed that maneuver in the ’80s, benefiting from the same astute management and timely product introductions that made Ford Motor Company the industry’s profit leader by 1986. Though no one Mercury line was among Detroit’s top-selling nameplates, the make’s total production rose rapidly from 347,700 for 1980 to a decade high of nearly half a million U.S.-built cars for ’84 — an impressive recovery, though still far below record ’79 (669,000-plus). On the model-year board, Mercury sat anywhere from sixth to ninth, as it had since the ’50s, but managed fifth for 1983, its best finish ever.

As before, the Mercury line paralleled Ford’s except for somewhat higher prices and different model/equipment mixes. Styling also remained similar through 1982, but the following year saw the return of a more-distinctive Mercury look. Much sooner than GM, Dearborn had correctly concluded that too many clones spoil the sales broth. With the 1983 models, Mercury cars and Mercury parts again began standing more clearly apart from parent Fords — and GM rivals — to the ­undoubted ­benefit of sales.

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